Africa.com https://www.africa.com Stay Smart About Africa Thu, 19 Apr 2018 17:10:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Nigeria WAWE Expo Opens Its Doors In Landmark Centre In Lagos https://www.africa.com/nigeria-wawe-expo-opens-doors-landmark-centre-lagos/ https://www.africa.com/nigeria-wawe-expo-opens-doors-landmark-centre-lagos/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 15:22:02 +0000 https://www.africa.com/?p=96527 WAWE EXPO will bring together a comprehensive range of the latest technologies and developments in sustainable utilization of water resources, water management, water and wastewater treatment and reuse of water on the same platform. It will be held from 10-12 July 2018 at the Landmark Centre in Lagos. Nigeria is NOT water poor country BUT [...]

Originally published at Africa.com

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WAWE EXPO will bring together a comprehensive range of the latest technologies and developments in sustainable utilization of water resources, water management, water and wastewater treatment and reuse of water on the same platform. It will be held from 10-12 July 2018 at the Landmark Centre in Lagos.

WAWE Expo

Nigeria is NOT water poor country BUT there is a need for the building of modern wastewater treatment facilities!

Installations for treating and recycling industrial and sewage wastewater are in demand as this will impact the environment positively and prevent contamination of both surface and groundwater.

The Industry involves, distribution networks, water pipelines, the supply of distribution equipment, supply of water meters, household water systems, water pumps and other plumbing installations, waste water treatment, water users are either industrial or domestic consumers. Industrial include packaging companies, beverage plants/breweries, bottled water companies, food companies, and a lot of industries. Others include Irrigation Systems, River Basin Development Authorities, State Water Boards such as Lagos State Water Corporation, Port Harcourt Water Board, Kaduna State Water Corporation and so many more which have a huge government and International bodies supporting them.

Meet the new technology according to your essential need “Water”:

Gathering the players of the water and wastewater treatment technologies sector under a single roof and recognized as the first and only specialized exhibition of the sector, WAWE EXPO will attract a great attention. It is also expecting to gather more than 5000 trade visitors from West Africa including industry professionals and government bodies. It promises to be an outstanding on-the-spot market of products, connections and opportunities for building strong partnerships and sourcing valuable information on advanced technologies.

The two events, concurrently, WAWE EXPO & HVAC EXPO provide an unique integrated global platform for government and industry leaders to share solutions for sustainable urban development and the latest innovations in water and clean environment solutions also for air conditioning sector. Exhibitors and participants would be able to explore synergies, network and forge partnerships with a wider range of global industry leaders, policy-makers and experts. Together, the two events showcase global thought leadership in sustainable development. For more information, visit: www.westafricawaterexpo.com

About Elan Expo;

Elan Expo is an independent pure-play trade event organizer, established with an entrepreneurial vision to provide fast ROI to its customers by leading them into emerging new markets. The company owns and organizes leading international trade fairs and b2b exhibitions, around the middle east and Africa in specialized industry sectors.

We are an enthused, organic and customer-focused company, creating content for the specific industry and region of each event. Our main emphasis is to deliver events that bring maximum ROI to our exhibitors. Whether you’re looking to enter a new market, introduce your products, find partners/distributors or make new connections in your industry, we invite you to join us in our expedition.

We pride ourselves on our ability to develop relationships with the leaders of the industry, bringing qualified decision-makers together and establishing our events as the industry meeting place.

Other details about the programme include:

Visiting Dates: 10-12 July 2018
Visiting Hours: 10:00 – 18:00
Venue: Landmark Event Centre 2 & 3 Water Corporation Road Victoria Island, Lagos – Nigeria

Contact: info@westafricawaterexpo.com

Originally published at Africa.com

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IBM & Twiga Foods Introduce Blockchain Based Microfinancing For Food Kiosk Owners In Kenya https://www.africa.com/ibm-twiga-foods-introduce-blockchain-based-microfinancing-food-kiosk-owners-kenya/ https://www.africa.com/ibm-twiga-foods-introduce-blockchain-based-microfinancing-food-kiosk-owners-kenya/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 14:33:14 +0000 https://www.africa.com/?p=96520 Late last year Nairobi-based Twiga Foods, a business-to-business logistics platform for kiosks and food stalls in Africa, was looking to expand its logistic services into a total market ecosystem by adding financial services for its clients. Grant Brooke, co-founder the $13 million start-up explains, “Previously, we were focused on helping farmers distribute bananas, tomatoes, onions and potatoes to 2,600 [...]

Originally published at Africa.com

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Late last year Nairobi-based Twiga Foods, a business-to-business logistics platform for kiosks and food stalls in Africa, was looking to expand its logistic services into a total market ecosystem by adding financial services for its clients.

IBM and Twiga Foods

Grant Brooke, co-founder the $13 million start-up explains, “Previously, we were focused on helping farmers distribute bananas, tomatoes, onions and potatoes to 2,600 kiosks across Kenya, but we soon realized that we could help them sell even more produce with access to working capital. It’s simple, if the food vendors can sell more, we can distribute more, growing both of our businesses.”

Brooke didn’t have far to look and formed a collaboration with IBM scientists in Nairobi to build and test a blockchain-enabled finance lending platform. But there was a catch. How could loans be provided when most of the vendors lack a credit score?

IBM and Twiga Foods

Luckily, IBM scientists know a thing or two about using machine learning and mobile data and how to apply both towards developing credit scores – they’ve done it before. In a previous project with an African bank and mobile operator more than $3 million in loans were distributed.

“We analyzed purchase records from a mobile device and then apply machine learning algorithms to predict credit worthiness, in turn giving lenders the confidence they need to provide microloans to small businesses. Once the credit score is determined, we used a blockchain, based on the Hyperledger Fabric, to manage the entire lending process from application to receiving offers to accepting the terms to repayment,” said Isaac Markus, a researcher on the inclusive financial services group at IBM Research in Kenya.

With blockchain, the lending process becomes transparent to all permissioned parties involved, from the lending bank to the borrower’s bank and the loan applicant themselves. Blockchains are immutable, helping to reduce fraud, since no one single party can append the blockchain without consensus from the entire network. Finally, blockchains employ a series of “smart contracts” which can be executed in real time, having the potential to significantly reduce the time it takes to manually process and issue a loan.

To test the new platform Twiga Foods and IBM ran a pilot at the end of last year with 220 small food kiosks, known locally as “mama mbogas” in Swahili, across Kenya.

The eight-week pilot processed more than 220 loans with the average loan around $30 (3,020 KES), which increased the order size by 30 percent and profits for each retailer, on average, by six percent. The loans were for four and eight days with an interest rate of one and two percent, respectively.

All of the loans were executed via mobile phone and went directly toward working capital for the businesses. When a retailer had an order delivered, they would get an SMS with loan options for financing that order. They would then respond to the SMS confirming the loan option they preferred.

“We had several iterations of the platform based on feedback from the retailers. The SMS-based solution provided an effective channel for a diverse set of users, some with limited IT literacy, to access financing for their orders,” said Andrew Kinai, the lead software engineer on the project at IBM Research.

Based on the success of the pilot, the plan is for the platform to be rolled out to more SMEs across Africa by the end of the year and expanded into new sectors.

Originally published at Africa.com

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Rand Strengthens And South African Consumers Benefit From Lower Inflation https://www.africa.com/rand-strengthens-south-african-consumers-benefit-lower-inflation/ https://www.africa.com/rand-strengthens-south-african-consumers-benefit-lower-inflation/#respond Tue, 17 Apr 2018 14:59:25 +0000 https://www.africa.com/?p=96501 Mastercard SpendingPulse report shows moderate growth in consumer spending, but general dealer sales continue to underperform. Total South African retail sales for February 2018 increased 3.5 percent year-on-year, after removing the effects of inflation. Compared to each of the five previous months of February, sales volumes were 4.6 percent higher on average. This is according [...]

Originally published at Africa.com

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Mastercard SpendingPulse report shows moderate growth in consumer spending, but general dealer sales continue to underperform.

Total South African retail sales for February 2018 increased 3.5 percent year-on-year, after removing the effects of inflation. Compared to each of the five previous months of February, sales volumes were 4.6 percent higher on average. This is according to the Mastercard SpendingPulse February 2018 report, which provides a macroeconomic analysis of retail spending trends in South Africa.

With the effects of inflation included, retail sales for February 2018 grew 6.8 percent year-on-year. The gap between retail sales with inflation included and inflation excluded fell to just 3.3 percentage points, down from 3.5 percent in January 2018, which is the smallest difference since SpendingPulse started tracking South African consumer trends in 2013.

“The strengthening of South Africa’s currency, which ended February 10.6% above its prior-year level vs. the US Dollar, has helped to alleviate inflation pressures.  Food prices rose in line with the consumer price index (CPI), after climbing faster than CPI for each of the past 28 months,” says Sarah Quinlan, Senior Vice President and Group Head of Market Insights for Mastercard.

“For March and April, we will be keeping an eye on how policy changes such as a one percentage point increase in VAT will impact the consumer, as the government seeks to trim an expected R48.2 billion budget deficit. The anticipated VAT hike may have boosted consumer spending in March, but could add to inflationary pressures in the months to follow.”

Key findings of the Mastercard SpendingPulse South Africa February 2018 report include:

  • Total retail sales for the three months (December 2017, January and February 2018) grew at an average rate of 3.7 percent year-over-year (removing the effects of inflation), compared to a 3.3 percent growth rate in the fourth quarter of 2017.
  • Pharmaceuticals, medical goods, cosmetics and toiletry retail sales, excluding the effects of inflation, accelerated 3.6 percent year-on–year. With inflation included, sales were up 9.7 percent over 2017. The price gap remains elevated in this sector, as year-on-year consumer prices for health and personal care rose 5.7 percent and 8 percent respectively in February.
  • The general dealer sector, which includes food and other daily essentials, underperformed for a 16th consecutive month, with inflation-adjusted sales growing only by 0.2 percent year-on-year.  This marked a turnaround, however, from a 1.2 percent decline in year-on-year sales in January 2018. Including the effects of inflation, general dealer sales in February climbed 6.6 percent year-on-year.

Originally published at Africa.com

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ISFD to Contribute to the “Enroll & Retain Out-of-School Children Program” https://www.africa.com/isfd-enroll-retain-program/ https://www.africa.com/isfd-enroll-retain-program/#respond Sun, 15 Apr 2018 18:30:55 +0000 https://www.africa.com/?p=96470 Low literacy rates are a major restriction in many people’s lives. For example, poor literacy leaves people without the skills they need to run their own small businesses: tasks such as keeping accounts require at least a basic understanding of how to read, write and count. Low literacy affects rural areas in particular, contributing to another pervasive issue: rural poverty. [...]

Originally published at Africa.com

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Low literacy rates are a major restriction in many people’s lives. For example, poor literacy leaves people without the skills they need to run their own small businesses: tasks such as keeping accounts require at least a basic understanding of how to read, write and count. Low literacy affects rural areas in particular, contributing to another pervasive issue: rural poverty. This in turns leaves too few opportunities for youth and women in these areas to become economically active, forcing many to move to the growing towns and cities. To tackle these problems, the ISFD approved support for education initiatives at their annual meeting in Tunis.

Among the most ambitious and important programs in which the Board of Directors approved the ISFD to contribute to, was the enroll and retain out-of-school children program, which aims to help re-enroll 2.4 million children in schools in selected member countries, including Mali and Nigeria.  This program will be implemented in cooperation with the Qatari Foundation, Education Above All, the governments of beneficiary countries, international donors, international institutions and civil society organizations. The total cost of the program is US$375 million, of which the ISFD will contribute US$100 million.

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Islamic Solidarity Fund for Development concludes the 11th Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors in the Republic of Tunisia with Many Important Initiatives

ISFD

Islamic Solidarity Fund for Development

The Board of Governors of the Islamic Solidarity Fund for Development concluded its 11th meeting in Tunis. During the meeting, the Board approved ISFD’s annual report which highlighted the most important activities of the Fund in combating poverty in member countries.

Since its establishment, the ISFD has approved US$734 million to finance 117 soft loans and grants to 33 member countries. US$175 million of this amount was approved in 2017. Sectors included microfinance, renewable energy, agriculture and health.

Among the important programs in which the ISFD participated this year was its contribution of US$ 100 million to the Science, Technology and Innovation Fund, designed to provide scientists, innovators and small and medium-sized enterprises with funding to turn their ideas into projects. In 2017, the ISFD also supported other initiatives such as the Community Development Projects Initiative in Sierra Leone and Indonesia, the Pediatric fistula treatment initiative and the Yemen Humanitarian Support Project.

One of ISFD’s landmark initiatives include the “Avoidable Blindness Prevention Program“, which succeeded remarkably in mobilizing resources, more than ten times the initial target, under Phase 2 of this five-year alliance from 2018 to 2022. The ISFD allocated US$5 million to this program, with a target of US$25 million. It managed to mobilize an additional US$245 million in financial and in-kind contributions, which could conduct up to 1.5 million operations to remove white water, 10 million cases of eye screening and medical glasses provision for school children. The meeting attendees celebrated the launch of this alliance and signed agreements with 32 partners from different parts of the world.

In this context, the ISFD signed a memorandum of understanding with ETHIS CROWDFUNDING to launch a new crowd sourcing effort targeting US$1 million for the Blindness Program. This will test ISFD’s ability to mobilize resources for poverty alleviation programs from the public and the philanthropic community that would constitute a paradigm shift in the ISFD’s operations.

The ISFD has also developed innovative products for mobilizing resources, such as “Cash Waqf Sukuk” and “Ihsan Fund” for Waqf investments, being used to establish a special $100 million waqf fund for Al-Quds in cooperation with Cooperation Foundation, Jordan Commercial Bank and other partners. Today the ISFD signed a Memorandum of Understanding  with partners in Al-Quds Waqf to launch a Waqf, the proceeds of which will be dedicated to the people of Al-Quds to improve their standards of living.

The ISFD has also signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Islamic Corporation for Investment Insurance and Export Credit to establish a Takaful Fund to provide trade and sovereign guarantees to LDCs in order to attract investments and financing for economic empowerment projects for youth and disadvantaged groups and to support anti-poverty programs in these countries.

Originally published at Africa.com

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5 black ballet dancers you need to fix your eyes on https://www.africa.com/5-black-ballet-dancers-you-need-to-fix-your-eyes-on/ https://www.africa.com/5-black-ballet-dancers-you-need-to-fix-your-eyes-on/#respond Sat, 14 Apr 2018 07:22:24 +0000 https://www.africa.com/?p=96464 Black ballet dancers are not widely spoken about.  Most of the genres of dancing which feature women of color are the mainstream ones we see on social media and on our television sets.  The following ballet dancers dare to be great in a world where dancing is so rigid, many do not make the [...]

Originally published at Africa.com

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Black ballet dancers are not widely spoken about.  Most of the genres of dancing which feature women of color are the mainstream ones we see on social media and on our television sets.  The following ballet dancers dare to be great in a world where dancing is so rigid, many do not make the cut.  Here are the ballet dancers you need to fix your eyes on.

Michaela DePrince

This Sierra-Leonean beauty was born Mabinty Bangura.  She was briefly raised as a Muslim however, became an orphan when the civil war in Sierra Leone started. When the orphanage she was living in was bombed, she escaped to a refugee camp.  After attending high school in the United States, she concurrently studied at The Rock School for Dance Education in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Afterwards, she was granted a scholarship to the American Ballet Theatre’s Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School of Ballet.  She often faced immense discrimination; being told that “America isn’t ready for a black ballerina.”  In 2011, she debuted in ‘Abdallah and the Gazelle of Basra’ making that her first European appearance.  After graduating in 2012 from the American Ballet Theatre, she joined the Dance Theatre of Harlem.  In 2013, DePrince relocated to Amsterdam and became a member of the Dutch National Ballet. In 2016, she was promoted to grand sujet, and then to soloist at the end of the year.

Eric Underwood

Underwood was born in a suburb of Washington, D.C. At the age of 14, he began his training as a dancer and by the end of the year was under the direction of the American Ballet. In 2000, He became a student at the Dance Theater of Harlem and was promoted to a soloist several months later. In 2003 he joined the American Ballet Theater. In 2006 he became a member of the Royal Ballet in 2006; again he rose to the ranks of soloist in 2008.  `In 2017 he parted ways with the Royal Ballet. Underwood has now undertaken the world of modeling and movement directing.

A post shared by Eric Underwood (@ericunderwood) on

Misty Copeland

Copeland was born in Kansas City, Missouri. She began her studies in Ballet in 1996 after being convinced to attend a dance class. She was further urged due to her mother and older sister’s long work days.  After studying for three months, she became efficient at en pointe. In 2000 she joined the American Ballet Theater studio company and in 2001 became a member of the Corps de ballet. After a delayed onset of puberty and taking birth control to induce puberty, Copeland developed a binge-eating disorder. The new development of her body coupled with the stress of societal pressures of how a ballerina is “supposed to look” left Copeland feeling unconfident. She decided, in turn, to build her strength and in doing so changed the aesthetic pressures placed on ballet dancers. She felt comfortable in her skin again. In 2007, she was appointed as a soloist at ABH.  As of 2008, Copeland has been the only African-American woman dancer since the inception of her career; the three other African-American dancers have since left the company.  In 2014 she became the only African-American woman to perform the role of Swanilda in Coppelia at the MET. In 2015, Copeland became the first Black woman to be promoted to principal ballerina in the 75 years of ABH’s founding.  In 2017, she danced with the  La Scala Theatre Ballet.

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Lauren Anderson

Born in 1965, Anderson started dancing at the age of 18 at the Houston Ballet.  In 1990, she became a principal dancer. This enabled her to become the second Black female dancer to be promoted to principal dancer at a premier American ballet company.  Anderson retired from dancing in 2006; she has gone on to become an outreach associate in Houston’s ballet education department, a lecturer on the topic of ballet dance, and conducts master classes throughout the Houston educational districts.

Fredrick Davis

Named Fredrick Eric Davis, he was born in Brooklyn, New York and later relocated to Tennessee.  Davis battled poverty and homelessness as a youth, nonetheless, things turned around for the better in 1998. It was then he began dancing in a city-funded program that worked in conjunction with Ballett Tennessee. After graduating in 2004, he was encouraged to join the Joffrey Ballet School where he stayed until 2007.  While at Joffrey, he studied at the American Ballet Theatre, Boston Ballet, and the North Carolina Dance Theatre respectively.  In 2008, Davis danced briefly with the Roxey Ballet Company before joining the Dance Theatre of Harlem.  In 2015, he left the Dance Theatre of Harlem and convened on a dance for America tour. He is now a principal guest artist at Ballet Tennessee and at Ballet Tucson.

All of these artists represent proof that forging your own path can produce great results. Black artists are more than capable of reaching the stars and beyond, even against the odds.

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This article is courtesy of Face2face Africa

F2FA LogoAn African-owned and operated media platform committed to informing and connecting black people around the world. Their mission is to bring a balanced perspective to the African narrative and provide the platform for discourse and interaction.

Originally published at Africa.com

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Is It Safe to Go on a Safari? Here’s What You Need to Know https://www.africa.com/safe-go-safari-heres-need-know/ https://www.africa.com/safe-go-safari-heres-need-know/#respond Fri, 13 Apr 2018 08:30:37 +0000 https://www.africa.com/?p=96456 Going on a safari in Africa is inspiring and exciting. It is also wild. And while wild animal encounters make the experience that much more memorable, they are the biggest reason why we should discuss safety. In this article, we are going to talk about how to prepare for an African safari, what to expect, and [...]

Originally published at Africa.com

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Going on a safari in Africa is inspiring and exciting. It is also wild. And while wild animal encounters make the experience that much more memorable, they are the biggest reason why we should discuss safety.

In this article, we are going to talk about how to prepare for an African safari, what to expect, and how to stay safe during an animal encounter.

Before you go

Science proves that the deadliest animal you’ll encounter during a safari is the mosquito. And this pesky little animal is responsible for spreading malaria. Therefore, make sure to get your vaccinations done before you leave. And while we are at it, don’t forget to pack mosquito repellent and wear it. Always!

You also want to carry a first-aid kit, which should include OTC medication for diarrhea, antihistamines, and a general painkiller. If you need to take certain medication, always carry the prescription with you. And to be on the safe side, ask your safari operator what you should pack for your safari.

During a walking safari

Walking safaris are one of the best ways to get close to wild animals. But this also means that safety precautions are higher than during other types of safaris. Here are some general safety rules during a walking safari:

  • Never go on a walking safari without a guide. A guide ensures that you get the best experience, all thanks to their knowledge and safari safety training. Always obey their instructions.
  • Safari clothing should help you blend into the background. Avoid black, while, and camouflage. Choose khaki, brown, and green.
  • Never run. The only thing that runs in Africa is prey. And you don’t want to be considered pray!
  • Walk in a single line, as instructed by your guide.
  • Keep quiet. While the animals are used to vehicles, they are not used to human voices, and any sudden noise can trigger an attack or defense mechanism.
  • Do not eat or drink anything other than water. Don’t even think about smoking.
  • Do not attempt to change the animal’s behavior in any way. Trying to convince them to pose for a selfie may trigger an attack.
  • And remember that, although rhinos and elephants are massive, they charge at high speeds.

During a self-drive safari

Many prefer to go a self-drive safari to explore the wildlife independently. Needless to say, this poses greater security risks than if you were going on a guided game drive.

Here are some general safety rules during a game drive:

  • Keep quiet. While the animals are used to the vehicles and their noises, the human noise will disturb them. If you have to talk, do so quietly.
  • Don’t stand up or dangle your arms or legs out of the vehicle. The animals are used to the sounds and shapes of vehicles, but anything “poking” out of them may trigger a reaction; they will either stand back or attack.
  • Speaking of those limbs outside of the vehicle, you might want to watch out for low-hanging branches that can be quite thorny.
  • Same as with walking safaris, do not disturb the wildlife just so that you can get a better shot.
  • No smoking. The African bush is dry, and fire hazard is high.
  • Drink only water. Sweet drinks lure insects. Also, do not eat anything while on a game drive.
  • No littering.
  • Be prepared for various weather conditions: bring sunscreen, a hat, and a windbreaker. A warm top is great to pack, too.
  • Always travel with a map, working phone, and GPS (if possible).
  • Remember that the drivers in Africa don’t necessarily follow the rules, so always drive carefully.
  • Stop and rest often.
  • Try to avoid driving at night.

Game drives are rather similar to self-drive safaris, but you do have the added safety of a guide. As they are trained to ‘see’ the animals’ reactions, they can tell you how to act so that you can stay safe.

General safety

It’s important to note that political turmoil may be a concern when traveling to Africa. In countries such as Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, as well as Western Tanzania and Northern Kenya, you need to pay attention to these kinds of incidents.

Always check the updated travel advisories. USA’s Department of State regularly posts updated advisories and while we do not recommend to completely avoid a country, knowing what’s going on can make the difference between a safe and a not-so-safe experience.

Interested in going on a private safari to enjoy the plethora of the African wildlife? Check out the vast selection of safaris we have on offer and book the one that appeals to you most.


Cris Puscas

Cris is a contributing writer at BookAllSafaris.com. An avid hiker and passionate landscape photographer, she believes that all animals should be protected and loved.

Originally published at Africa.com

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Moussa Mara, Candidate At The Next Presidential Elections In Mali https://www.africa.com/moussa-mara-candidate-next-presidential-elections-mali/ https://www.africa.com/moussa-mara-candidate-next-presidential-elections-mali/#respond Fri, 13 Apr 2018 06:57:31 +0000 https://www.africa.com/?p=96447 Moussa Mara, Candidate at the next presidential elections in Mali, is expected as speaker at the conference on the theme: “What role for Africa and Europe in the world as it emerges?” in Paris, France Dear valued media partners, The « Institut Montaigne » and the OCP Policy Center would like to invite members of [...]

Originally published at Africa.com

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Presidential Elections In Mali

Moussa Mara, Candidate at the next presidential elections in Mali, is expected as speaker at the conference on the theme: “What role for Africa and Europe in the world as it emerges?” in Paris, France

Moussa MaraDear valued media partners, The « Institut Montaigne » and the OCP Policy Center would like to invite members of the media to join them as they organize a conference on the theme: What role for Africa and Europe in the world as it emerges?

When: Thursday, April 12th ,2018Who: Moussa MARA, former Prime Minister of Mali, Candidate to the Presidential election of Mali,

Lionel ZINSOU, President of Terra Nova, former Prime Minister of Benin,

Dalila BERRITANE, consultant influence & communication in Africa

Dominique LAFONT, CEO, Lafont Africa Corporation, Executive Chairman, NVH

Soli ÖZEL, professor of international relations, Kadir Has University, Istanbul

 Where: AXA Headquarters 25 avenue Matignon, Paris 8ème, FRANCE.

Why: For many Europeans, Africa is both an economic eldorado and a continent that raises concerns, particularly demographic and migratory. How to reconcile these perceptions? How to concretely build collaborations between these two spaces? And contribute to their economic, social and political development in the coming decades? Participating in this conference will allow you to interact with a high-level panel on migration and demographic issues between Africa and Europe.

For further queries please contact OCP Policy Center at +212 5 37 27 08 60.

Originally published at Africa.com

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Africa Innovation Summit II https://www.africa.com/africa-innovation-summit-ii/ https://www.africa.com/africa-innovation-summit-ii/#respond Fri, 13 Apr 2018 06:42:07 +0000 https://www.africa.com/?p=96441 The Africa Innovation Summit (AIS II), which will take place from 6-8 June 2018 in Kigali, Rwanda, under the esteemed patronage of His Excellences President Paul Kagame and Pedro Pires (ex-President of Cabo Verde), announced a call for applications to innovators across Africa whose solutions have the potential to solve the continent’s challenges. The AIS [...]

Originally published at Africa.com

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Africa Innovation SummitThe Africa Innovation Summit (AIS II), which will take place from 6-8 June 2018 in Kigali, Rwanda, under the esteemed patronage of His Excellences President Paul Kagame and Pedro Pires (ex-President of Cabo Verde), announced a call for applications to innovators across Africa whose solutions have the potential to solve the continent’s challenges.

The AIS II seeks innovative and disruptive solutions to the major challenges facing African countries, which include energy access, water, food insecurity, health systems, and governance. As a platform for multi-stakeholder dialogue and actions, AIS II will bring together people with the power to act, from all parts of the continent and elsewhere, including Heads of States and Governments, Ministers, corporates, innovators, investors, policy makers and academics, researchers, as well as policy, science and technology experts, with the aim of building robust ecosystems for innovation in Africa to ensure Africa’s structural transformation.

Dr. Olugbenga Adesida, co-Director of AIS, indicated that “AIS provides more than a robust and dynamic platform for multi-stakeholder dialogue, but rather a catalyst for “Made in Africa” innovations that are already addressing the challenges faced on the continent, but need assistance to take root and scale across the continent. “

The AIS has partnered with Enterpriseroom, a transformation consultancy specializing in starting, sustaining, and accelerating businesses, to drive the sourcing and selection of up to 50 Innovations across the continent, to be showcased at the Summit. The CEO of Entepriseroom, Tracey Webster, said “We are delighted to partner with the AIS and believe the innovations selected to be showcased at the Summit will have a unique opportunity to engage the right stakeholders when it comes to discussing and unlocking blockages in the eco-system that are preventing solutions from going to scale, or ideas being commercialized.” AIS firmly believes that the solutions are in Africa and innovators need to be at the table architecting a conducive environment for Innovation to thrive in Africa.

AIS is therefore calling all African innovators to apply for this unique opportunity. The innovators selected must meet the following criteria:
• Know or have an innovative idea or solution that can drive positive change in Africa and;
• The solution must be at a critical stage: either ready to commercilaise or ready to scale.

The identified innovators will meet influential people, policy makers, and investors who are ready to discuss Africa’s development challenges and ways to solve them. They will also have the opportunity to interact with
like-minded African innovators and change agents who are driving a new era of change in Africa.

Applications and additional information can be found on the AIS website: http://www.africainnovationsummit.com/innovation-track. Applications close Midnight Sunday 15 April 2018 (CAT).

Originally published at Africa.com

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Upstream West Africa Summit 2018 #USWA18 https://www.africa.com/upstream-west-africa-summit-2018-uswa18/ https://www.africa.com/upstream-west-africa-summit-2018-uswa18/#respond Fri, 13 Apr 2018 05:57:18 +0000 https://www.africa.com/?p=96431 “Developing the Deepwater Hydrocarbon Potential of West Africa’s E&P Hotspot” The Upstream West Africa Summit separates itself from traditional conferences and exhibitions. There are no booths or exhibition halls at our summit. We focus on delivering extremely high quality, high level gatherings with some of the most senior executives in the oil and gas sector in an [...]

Originally published at Africa.com

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“Developing the Deepwater Hydrocarbon Potential of West Africa’s E&P Hotspot”

Upstream West Africa Summit

The Upstream West Africa Summit separates itself from traditional conferences and exhibitions. There are no booths or exhibition halls at our summit. We focus on delivering extremely high quality, high level gatherings with some of the most senior executives in the oil and gas sector in an intimate five star environment. All the themes and topics of our summit are end user driven and are put together by our content committee, which consists of our delegation, and government relations team who set the hot themes and issues that are currently facing the oil and gas industry.

We are able to impact your business development efforts in the region by arranging pre-determined closed-door business meetings with senior executives. Our project intelligence reports ensure that every meeting you have will be extremely targeted, and you will know exactly who you will meet and the topics that will be discussed weeks in advance of the summit commencing. We only set-up mutually agreed meetings, ensuring there’s synergy and gives you the best possible chance of doing business at the summit. This approach allows you to consolidate 6 to 12 months’ business meetings into the 3 days, cutting your travel times and expenditure.

In this climate, we understand that justifying your marketing spend is crucial and we ensure that the work we do for our clients pre and post event give you the best possible chance of leaving our summit with a substantial return on investment.

For more information please email: natalie.stone@valemediagroup.comorclaire.hewitson@valemediagroup.com

Originally published at Africa.com

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Is South Africa lagging behind when it comes to Women in C-Suite roles? https://www.africa.com/south-africa-lagging-behind-comes-women-c-suite-roles/ https://www.africa.com/south-africa-lagging-behind-comes-women-c-suite-roles/#respond Fri, 13 Apr 2018 05:41:28 +0000 https://www.africa.com/?p=96426 Having so much recent focus on women and their roles in society is, of course, a good thing. Even if, very belated. It is clear that change needs to happen and needs to be on a much deeper level. Not the superficial, token changes that are mostly seen, but real change. Real acceptance. Yet is [...]

Originally published at Africa.com

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Having so much recent focus on women and their roles in society is, of course, a good thing. Even if, very belated. It is clear that change needs to happen and needs to be on a much deeper level. Not the superficial, token changes that are mostly seen, but real change. Real acceptance. Yet is this truly happening in South Africa?

Women in C-Suite roles

Women in the workplace, mothers in the office, dual income homes – these trends have been widely discussed and are no longer hot topics but are we still ignoring the proverbial elephant in the room?

Globally there have been massive shifts in the perceptions of women in the workplace and huge improvements in inclusiveness in organisations at all levels and therefore we seem to be making extensive progress in removing gender biases and inequalities from the workplace. Nevertheless, when it comes to women in business in South Africa change has been slow and in many cases superficial. The disparity in male and female board member distribution is glaring and persistent. Power disparities appear to still work in the favour of men, and women can be seen to be the victims in most instances of sexual harassment in the workplace. Change cannot reasonably be expected to be instantaneous, but so too is it unreasonable to prolong, at the very least, the transformation of board composition. The motivations for a greater female presence in C-Suite positions are well-documented, so why the big resistance?

What really needs to happen?

Women want to be taken seriously. Their differences are very often their greatest assets and companies need to recognise this. There needs to be a shift in thinking away from antiquated beliefs surrounding women in positions of power. Change cannot be driven by legislation and vague good governance practices alone. Until leaders acknowledge the value in board diversity, and advocate policy that drives meaningful inclusiveness at an executive level, female representation will remain dwarfed. Change needs to be driven by a genuine respect and understanding for the value of contributions women in business make and a desire to rectify the deeply engrained, highly sensitive and perpetuating gender issues of South Africa.

Getting to the board is problematic enough but so often if a woman sits on the board of a firm, she is joined by men only. This needs to change. Very often being alone means the female voice is lost or talked down to and dismissed. However, what makes it even more difficult, is very often those doing the dismissive behaviour are not even aware as it is so deeply entrenched in who they are. Therefore, there is often not enough consciousness to change this behaviour.

However, as much as female voices are often unheard by their male colleagues, similarly they are dismissed by other women. Women need to support and mentor each other as much as men need to make room for them. Aside from the qualifications and business abilities, very often there is extra burden placed on females in that their appearance is also judged. And many times this is by other women. Which means on top of having to prove themselves as being relevant in the C-Suite, they also have to meet the expected high standards of physical appearances that others place on them. Furthermore, the prevailing difficulty in securing executive positions as a female often leads to rivalry between women as opposed to solidarity in tackling the mutually faced challenges.

How should this change happen?

As with any change, firstly the problems and prejudices need to be acknowledged. A true understanding of the rife inequality that exists in our boardrooms needs to be accepted. What really needs to happen is acceptance for all and appreciation for what women offer despite their gender or age. And very often this needs to start at home. Our ingrained ways of thinking mostly start in the environments we grow up in. Women are very often the greatest influencers at home – how they allow themselves to be treated, what behaviours are encouraged, and so on. They need to start treating their children equally so their daughters grow up believing they are capable of achieving what males can and their sons believe that females belong with them in all areas of life.

Men and women need to start to work together. Gender inequality is not a female issue that men ought to help out with. It is a human rights issue, necessitating a cohesive, systematic, and planned redress. All male executives need to educate themselves on gender issues as they relate to the workplace and integrate gender equality into strategic board plans. And learn to accept the differences in age, equality and backgrounds that exist.

And women need to make a stand, to ensure their voices are heard and not give up or let them fade into obscurity. It has been ingrained in women for so long that the man is always in power, is the leader and should always be listened to. Often women accept that this is just the way it is or don’t appreciate the gravity of the situation as this is “just the way it is”. It also can seem an insurmountable problem. However, it shouldn’t be and voices against inequality need to be heard – now is the time to speak up about biases and prejudice, even those which are covert. Women need to actively participate. Now is the time to make a stand against gender bias. Now is the time to educate those willing to listen. Everyone needs to support both female and male colleagues so that the differences between the two don’t eliminate either in any way but rather encourage the growth and development of everyone.

There is room for all at the table. But it is up to all to ensure this happens.

Rayne Handley, Principal Consultant for GRMs executive search, people development, board advisory, and leadership counselling practice.

Originally published at Africa.com

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