Protests and various governmental shutdowns are continuing throughout Egypt. Here’s Africa.com’s backgrounder in what you need to know about the ongoing conflicts.

After the deposing of former president Hosni Mubarak last year, and during the ensuing elections for a new leader, president Mohamed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood political party were chosen to lead Egypt.

Egypt protests

Egypt protests

Last month, Morsi and his parliament drafted a new constitution in which, among other items, Islamic edicts were given a much higher profile in governance, and many presidential powers were excused from judicial oversight. Parliament approved the draft constitution, and a referendum vote on its passage is scheduled for December 15.

According to the BBC, protests are continuing in front of the presidential palace, as citizens and left-wing party supporters vocally oppose the new constitution. While many judges excused themselves from official proceedings yesterday, Egypt’s highest court agreed to oversee the December 15th referendum, according to CNN.

11 Egyptian newspapers ceased publication today to protest the constitution’s potential power to limit media freedom. Three private television networks will be black tomorrow, according to the New York Times.

Africa.com will continue to update this post as the situation develops.