Council on Foreign Relations


Foreign Affairs

ICC on Trial
The Kenyatta Trial and International Justice
Kip Hale
Summary: 
In 2002, the International Criminal Court (ICC) came into being. At the time, observers were hopeful that rule of law could help constrain humanity’s worst impulses, a sentiment that, today, may seem foolhardy. Yet, where else would victims turn? Ruthless tyrants and their henchmen have killed, raped, and tortured innocents, and few, if any, international institutions have been able to stop them or provide justice after the fact.
In 2002, the International Criminal Court (ICC) came into being. At the time, observers were hopeful that rule of law could help constrain humanity’s worst impulses, a sentiment that, today, may seem foolhardy. Yet, where else would victims turn? Ruthless tyrants and their henchmen have killed, raped, and tortured innocents, and few, if any, international institutions have been able to stop them or provide justice after the fact.

Africa Calling
A Conversation With Mo Ibrahim
Mo Ibrahim
Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel, talks to Foreign Affairs about succeeding in the mobile sector, innovating in the developing world, and the future of governance in Africa.
Born in northern Sudan in 1946, Mo Ibrahim received a scholarship to Alexandria University, in Egypt, and graduated with a degree in electrical engineering in 1968. After several years working for Sudan’s state telecommunications company in Khartoum, he left for the United Kingdom to study mobile communications, first at the University of Bradford, for his master’s degree, and then at the University of Birmingham, for his Ph.D.
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The Real Cost of Ebola
Letter From Monrovia
Javier Alvarez
Summary: 
The Liberian government and international organizations have been most focused on containing Ebola, as they should be. The containment policies, however, have come with unintended economic consequences that need to be addressed to avert an even worse crisis.

Six days a week, women like Kuma Zay sell brightly colored red and green peppers, onions, and other vegetables in Monrovia’s Gobachop Market. Although larger wholesale markets were initially shut down in the wake of the country’s Ebola crisis, Gobachop and other local markets have remained open throughout. Although Zay and the other women fear they will contract the Ebola virus, they are desperate to provide for their families. “Before Ebola, I sold maybe ten to 15 big bags of peppers per day. Now, I sell maybe two to three bags,” says Zay.

In our household surveys, 66 percent of respondents reported a decrease in household income.

Council on Foreign Relations

Tuesday, 12-16-14Domestic Politics and China's Health Aid to AfricaThis study explores the role of domestic politics in China’s health-related development assistance to Africa. It identifies domestic politics as a constant, even critical, component in shaping and structuring China’s health aid to Africa.
Thursday, 12-11-14Can Nigeria Endure Falling Oil Prices?Nigeria’s heavy dependence on oil revenues puts it in a risky position economically and politically, raising new concerns about instability in Africa’s most populous country, writes CFR’s John Campbell.
Thursday, 12-11-14Facing Death Without Spreading DiseaseIn the second piece in this four-part series, Laurie Garrett reports on how Sierra Leone’s traditional burial practices spread Ebola, and why officials struggle to count the toll.
Wednesday, 12-10-14Sierra Leone’s Ebola Epidemic is Spiraling out of ControlIn this piece for ForeignPolicy.com, Laurie Garrett examines why Liberia, once the epicenter of the Ebola outbreak, been able to stop a rampaging killer disease, while Sierra Leone can't even count its dead.
Tuesday, 12-09-14Ebola Update: Assessment From AfricaExperts recently returned from trips to West Africa with medical teams operating Ebola-treatment units there discuss the situation on the ground and developments in the international response to the crisis.
Tuesday, 12-09-14Ebola Update: Assessment From Africa - Ebola Update: Assessment From AfricaExperts recently returned from trips to West Africa with medical teams operating Ebola-treatment units there discuss the situation on the ground and developments in the international response to the crisis.
Monday, 12-01-14U.S. Policy Toward Sub-Saharan AfricaThe four articles in this package offer analysis and recommendations for U.S. policy toward the fast-changing, often overlooked region of sub-Saharan Africa.
Wednesday, 11-19-14U.S. Policy to Counter Nigeria's Boko HaramJohn Campbell, Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies, evaluates the implications of the Boko Haram insurgency and recommends that the United States support Nigerian efforts to address the drivers of Boko Haram, such as poverty and corruption, and to foster stronger ties with Nigerian civil society. 

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